Links To Go (May 3, 2018)

When Americans Say They Believe in God, What Do They Mean?

A new Pew Research Center survey of more than 4,700 U.S. adults finds that one-third of Americans say they do not believe in the God of the Bible, but that they do believe there is some other higher power or spiritual force in the universe. A slim majority of Americans (56%) say they believe in God “as described in the Bible.” And one-in-ten do not believe in any higher power or spiritual force.


Six Myths about Outreach in the Local Church

  1. Outreach is the same as visiting guests.
  2. If you invite them, they will not come.
  3. The majority of non-Christians are resistant to the gospel.
  4. The sermon cannot be too deep or it will turn off non-Christians
  5. Attractional outreach is the most effective.
  6. Most church members will reach out to their friends, neighbors, and acquaintances naturally.

Is Your Church Really Focused on Evangelism? Maybe Not.

Individuals who are truly passionate about building thriving church communities will be willing to push the envelope on their comfort level in order to create disciples. They’ll also be willing to encourage their congregation to do the same.
Does this approach sound forced? Maybe it does. But the point is that after a few times of being asked, “Who did you share the gospel with this week?” our team members and colleagues won’t need to fumble for words. Sharing Jesus after a while will become something all of us do automatically—not because we have to, but because we want to.


My Young Friend Wants to Be a Missionary: Here’s the Advice I Gave When He Asked

  • Immerse Yourself in the Bible
  • Familiarize Yourself with the World
  • Read Missionary Biographies
  • Be In Ministry Now
  • Support Missionaries and Seek Out Mentors
  • Go On Short-Term Mission Trips
  • Pray

Jeff Bezos Banned PowerPoint in Meetings

In his letter, and in a recent discussion at the Forum on Leadership at the Bush Center, Bezos revealed that “narrative structure” is more effective than PowerPoint. According to Bezos, new executives are in for a culture shock in their first Amazon meetings. Instead of reading bullet points on a PowerPoint slide, everyone sits silently for about 30 minutes to read a “six-page memo that’s narratively structured with real sentences, topic sentences, verbs and nouns.”


The two-pizza rule and the secret of Amazon’s success

In the early days of Amazon, Jeff Bezos instituted a rule: every internal team should be small enough that it can be fed with two pizzas. The goal wasn’t to cut down on the catering bill. It was, like almost everything Amazon does, focused on two aims: efficiency and scalability. The former is obvious. A smaller team spends less time managing timetables and keeping people up to date, and more time doing what needs to be done. But it’s the latter that really matters for Amazon.
The thing about having lots of small teams is that they all need to be able to work together, and to be able to access the common resources of the company, in order to achieve their larger goals.


An American Airlines Passenger Was Stuck Next to a ‘Screaming and Kicking’ Toddler. His Stunning Reaction Went Viral

Walker reached for the baby and held him while I forced a seatbelt on Caroline, got her tablet, and started her movie. Once she was settled and relatively calmed, he distracted her so that I could feed Alexander. Finally, while we were taxiing, the back of the plane no longer had screams. During the flight, he colored and watched a movie with Caroline, he engaged in conversation and showed her all the things outside.
By the end of the flight, he was Caroline’s best friend. I’m not sure if he caught the kiss she landed on his shoulder while they were looking out the window.
Walker also was on the same connecting flight in Charlotte that Rudeen planned to take. He walked her daughter through the terminal to the new gate, and then asked to have his seat reassigned so he could sit next to the family and help out on the second flight, too.


The Fascinating Way That Words Can Change How We Perceive Colors

Which colors have names in a particular language influences the colors we see. Japanese, Russian, and Greek, for instance, include terms that differentiate between light blue and dark blue. While an English speaker might look at a sky blue shirt and a navy blue shirt and say, “Look, a pair of blue shirts!” a Japanese speaker would disagree, just as we might disagree with someone who speaks Bassa about whether red, orange, and yellow are all one color. However, if you spend enough time immersed in a language that has fewer color terms, it appears that the way you describe color may narrow—according to one study, Greek speakers who spend a lot of time in the UK tend to stop distinguishing between two different blues, ghalazio and ble, and begin lumping them into a single category of blue.


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