Mystery and subterfuge in the blogosphere

OK, an extra post today. Things are not always what they seem. Seems I’ve been had, deceived by some people who feel that the New Covenant allows us to use lies and deceit in our dealings with one another. Interesting, to say the least.

Had a new commenter come in and begin commenting on an old post. Someone else jumped in claiming “I have been a member of the Church of Christ for many years, but have never heard of this kind of teaching.” This person would ask questions, encouraging the other commenter and keeping the thread alive. The “seeker” spoke of how convincing the first man’s arguments were and how wrong I was.

And I fell for it. Sigh…

The one who had “never heard this kind of teaching” is Daniel Ross, who has long maintained websites promoting the teachings of Dan Billingsly. (Some will know that name) Had he participated honestly in the thread, I would have had no problem with it. But coming in deceitfully and lying about being new to these ideas… well, that’s just not right.

You see, “Albert,” the one who had never heard this teaching before and was being convinced of its truth, uses the same IP address as Daniel. That can occur when two people are on the same network, but it does reduce the likeliness that “Albert” and Daniel don’t know each other. However, in creating the lie, Daniel made the mistake of using one of his own e-mail addresses for the fictitious Albert. Is it possible that someone gave up an e-mail address and someone else now uses it? Yes. But to have the IP address and the e-mail coincide… that’s too much.

I’m hoping that Mickey and Daniel don’t know each other, though if they do, I hope they’ll be honest enough to come clean.

I’m guessing that when some discuss the Bible verses that have nothing to say to Christians, they must include these as well:

“But have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the word of God deceitfully; but by manifestation of the truth commending ourselves to every man’s conscience in the sight of God.” (2 Corinthians 4:2)
“For our exhortation was not of deceit, nor of uncleanness, nor in guile:” (1 Thessalonians 2:3)

Summertime… and the posting ain’t easy

summerOK, let me state the obvious: I’m not going to be posting regularly to this blog during the summer. Too many trips. Too many distractions. Too many other things going on.

Slow down. Take a deep breath. You’ll get through this somehow.

Thanks for reading! I’ll get back into a regular routine in a few weeks.

 

Photo courtesy of MorgueFile.com

Becoming an aggregator

booksI love it when people help me find good things to read. The Internet has made that infinitely easier; sharing articles, photos, and videos is an intricate part of what we do. That’s one of the main things I look for on Twitter, and my principal activity on Twitter is sharing links.

David Smith regularly shares his “this went thru my mind,” a collection of links on subjects of interest to him. Ed Stetzer does something similar with his “Morning Roundup.” I want to begin to do the same in The Kitchen.

I principally read in these areas:

  • Theology (duh)
  • Immigration
  • Technology (particularly as it relates to non-profits and churches)
  • Travel
  • Sports (particularly the San Antonio Spurs)
  • Cuba (because of the work that I do there)

There are other blogs and things I find interesting along the way, like the work of the Pew Research Center, Seth Godin’s blog, and some of the unusual or funny news stories. Those are the sorts of things I would share. I’ll probably limit some of the things (like Spurs stories) that I find mainly of interest to me.

Some questions for you:

  • Would it be better to post these links at the bottom of other posts or make them separate posts?
  • Is it better to group links thematically or just post them soon after finding them?
  • Should I stick to posts that directly relate to things that have been discussed on this blog, or would people also be interested to read about travel, technology, etc.?

Thanks for reading and for sharing your thoughts!

 

photo from MorgueFile.com

What people read last year

I’m not usually a big fan of people publishing their “top posts from the past year.” However, this past week I found several excellent posts that I had missed during the year, finding them through yearly summaries the authors put on their blog.

So, on the outside chance that you find something worth reading, here goes last year’s most read posts:

Barhopping in the Kitchen — That’s right… the most read post was a bunch of bad jokes.

Audio from Ray Vander Laan — I’m glad that people are accessing this material. I actually posted this two years ago, but it continues to get lots of views.

Ecclesiastes: Money is the answer for everything! — This post is even older, yet garners a lot of interest. Either people are intrigued by that verse from Ecclesiastes or they’re hoping that money really is the answer for everything.

Mark Driscoll on the Regulative and Normative Principles of Worship — I’m guessing that Google was my friend on this one; people that want to know what Driscoll has to say were finding out through my blog.

“My Word will not return unto me void” — Another older post that still generates traffic. It’s actually on the blog twice; both posts still get a lot of reads.

The Decline of Pacifism in Churches of Christ — I’m glad people are interested in this topic. So many people don’t realize how the churches of Christ in general have changed their position over the years. (And yes, this is a 2011 post)

Bilingual church vs. bilingual ministry — Lots of people are interested in this topic; glad that this post from 2009 can be a good resource for them.

Tempocentrism — Look, it’s a post from 2012! Written on January 3, this post had a lot of time to gather views. And I think it says some good things.

Lament — This post was fairly recent, so it’s traffic numbers are significant. However… some of the traffic is due to the graphic I used from Richard Beck’s blog.

OK, so there you have it. As a blogger, it’s interesting to see that much of what gathered interest on my blog was the work of other people. Not necessarily a bad thing, as I see it.

Now I’ll have to find some new things to share with you.

Top 2010 posts in The Kitchen

Well, the year is getting away from us. Two days from now will be 2011. I decided to look back through the archives and pick out some of the high points (low points?) in The Kitchen during 2010

January
Audio from Ray Vander Laan — This post brings more traffic to my blog than any other, not because people want to read what I have to say, but because they are looking for material from Ray Vander Laan!

February
Falling Away From Grace discussion (2/2-2/15) — I learned a lot during this discussion, especially about Calvinism and its teachings.
Sunday-Go-To-Meeting Clothes — A lot of people were interested in discussing our dress, even though I meant for the post to be about Leviticus!

March
Hugo Chavez and Jesus — A discussion about nationalism in the church

April
Romans 13 discussion (4/12-4/29) — Lots of good discussion about the meaning of this much-used passage

May
Forsaking The Assembling — Post examining one of the most-often misquoted verses in the Bible

June
Field Guide To Church Fauna series (6/28-7/8) — An attempt at satire that probably didn’t come off as it should have

July
When Original Isn’t Good — A look at the dangers of finding things no one else has ever seen

August-September
Study of To Change The World (8/13-9/16) — Probably the longest series I’ve ever done. Once again, this features someone else’ material.

October
Bringing The Ark (10/12-10/15) — People seemed to enjoy this study of the story of David bringing the Ark to Jerusalem

November
Lord’s Supper Stress Disorder — A look at how we often fail to consider outsiders when taking the Lord’s Supper

December
Study of The Next Christians (12/13-12/17) — Discussion of Gabe Lyons’ book