A week of thankfulness: Home

I’m thankful for my home. Not just this house. Not just my family. I’m thankful for all the things that go into making home home.

I’m blessed to have grown up in the United States. It’s a country that offers so many advantages, especially in terms of education, health care, etc. I’ve traveled enough to know that not every place offers the benefits that this country offers.

I’m blessed to have grown up in San Angelo. It’s a great city to grow up in. Small as cities go, but big enough to offer lots of opportunities for exploring and growing.

I’m blessed to have lived overseas. I’ve quoted Chesterton before, but it’s worth repeating: “The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one’s own country as a foreign land.” Living abroad changed forever the way I see my homeland and the way I see the world.

I’m blessed to have lived in Argentina. It’s a country rich in culture, with a people who value friendship and family. I learned values there that have served me well in my adult life.

I’m blessed to have lived in Stockdale. I learned much about how a church can be a community and a family. I also became a San Antonio Spurs fan! Stockdale offers little in terms of shopping, culture, etc., but is a place rich in the treasures of humanity.

I’m blessed to be living in Abilene. It’s an unusual city, shaped by the presence of three church-related universities. It’s a city that prides itself on morality, an excellent place to raise teenagers. I’m thankful that Abilene is my home.

When asked, “Where are you from?”, the answer is a long one. And I’m thankful for that.

photo by Kelly Piet

Feeling At Home

welcome matWe’re taking a family trip this weekend. Going to San Antonio for a few days, then going to Stockdale for a wedding. Stockdale is where we first went when we came back from Argentina. It still feels like home, even after being away for 3 years. I’m not entirely sure why that is. When we go back to Córdoba, that still feels like home. Stockdale feels like home.

What does is take for a place to feel like home? What does it take for a church to feel like home? Do you have “multiple homes” like I do? Any tips on coming to feel at home where we are now?

I can’t end this, of course, without a preacher-type application. In some ways, I hope I’ll never fully feel at home until I really am home.